Tag Archives: Mexico City

San Antonio Museum of Art – The Goddess and The King : Recent Archaeological Discoveries in Mexico City

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We had the great pleasure of attending a lecture and reception at The San Antonio Museum of Art . http://www.samuseum.org/ Professor Leonardo Lopez Lujan, the archeologist in charge of the Templo Mayor dig in Mexico City, presented the latest findings and discoveries ………….. they are amazing! Professor Lujan has been the senior researcher in archeology at the Museo del Templo Mayor in Mexico City and the Director of the Proyecto Templo Mayor since 1991. He participated in his first archeological dig at the age of eight. The Proyecto Templo Mayor of the Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia was created in 1978, when a monolith depicting Coyolxauhqui, the Aztec moon goddess was discovered as workers were digging a new subway line. Now, Professor Lujan’s team has discovered the largest Aztec sculpture ever found, that of the goddess Tlaltecuhtli.

aztec tomb picture

We arrived at the museum early to ensure a good seat, which, of course, meant a trip to the Cafe de Artistes for some wine………who would have guessed!!?!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lecture was quite engaging and the new finds so very amazing.

 

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Afterwards, we were able to visit with Dr. Lujan and discuss his exciting and interesting life.

 He is a most gracious and engaging individual.

To learn more about these wonderful digs, visit: www.mesoweb.com

The we were off to New Braunfels to eat some dinner at what once was the original post office and now houses a wonderful seafood restaurant.

www.mcadoos.com

Of course, more wine was in order, along with some yummy fried oysters and crayfish…most did not make it into the photo!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……and then the final course …… yummy fried soft shell crab. It was a most amazing day, filled with so many wonders.

Chapultepec Castle, Mexico City, Mexico

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Chapultepec Castle located in the middle of Chapultepec Park in Mexico City. Chapultepec comes from the Nahuatl word Chapultepec which means at the grasshopper’s hill. Chapultepec Castle is the only royal castle on the American continent. During the second Mexican Empire it was used to house the Mexican Emperor Maximilian I, who was the cousin of King Ludwig II builder of Neuschwanstein Castle (see post :Schloss Neuschwanstein – Castle)  and his consort Empress Carlota. The castle finds itself infused into the United Stated Marie Corps “Marines’ Hymn” “From the Halls of Montezuma” refers to the The Battle of Chapultepec in 1847, during the Mexican-American War. There is even a legend that the red stripe worn on the trousers of officers and noncommissioned offices of the Marine Corps, known as the blood stripe commemorates the high number of Marine NCOs and offices killed storming the castle of Chapultepec during that war.

In 1864 Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico chose the castle as his residence and also ordered the construction of a straight boulevard, modeled after the Champs-Elysees in Paris, to connect the castle with the city center and named it Paseo de la Emperatriz (Promenade of the Empress), in 1867, President Benito Juarez renamed it the Paseo de la Reforma.

The rooftop boasts beautiful gardens and views of the city.

Throughout the Castle are some of the most amazing displays of stained glass windows, with entire hallways framed in these beautiful works of art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The treasures contained within the Castle boggle the mind in their sheer quantity, artistry and elegance. The furnishings and even the royal bath are works of art.

Teotihuacan, Mexico

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We have been visiting Teotihuacan for the past 35 years and never seem to get enough.

 It is such a magical and majestic place.

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Teotihuacan is an enormous archaeological site in the Basin of Mexico, just 30 miles northeast of Mexico City, containing some of the largest pyramids built in the pre-Columbian Americas. Teotihuacan was established around 100 B.C. and was in continual formation and growth until around 250 A.D. At its peak the population was estimated to be 125,000, placing it among the largest cities of the world in this period. The echos of those people can still be heard as one walks along the Avenue of the Dead.

Diego stops to play a traditional Aztec tune on a flute in the Avenue of the Dead.

We stopped climbing to the top of the pyramids about 20 years ago, but our young Aztec warrior makes it seems like it is running on the clouds.

The early history of Teotihuacan is very mysterious, and the origin of the founders quite unclear. For years the credit to its birth was given to the Toltecs due in large to colonial period texts, such as the Florentine Codes, which attributed the formation of the site to this group. Iinterestingly enough the Nahuatl word Toltec means craftsman of the highest level and therefore, does not directly indicate that this specific tribe was responsible for this grand city. Others have attributed the foundation of the city to the Teotihuacano civilization, which includes the Zapotec, Mixtec and Maya, the Olmec have also been noted to have influenced the culture and architecture. Whoever was responsible for the magical place must be pleased that their creation captures the imagination of millions.